Christopher_Davison_The Six Senses.jpg

December 12, 2021
Interviewed by Shohei Takasaki

Christopher Davison

DYH :  Dear Chris, it’s been such a long time since we’ve seen each other. Perhaps it was at some random sports bar in Manhattan? First off, shall we start with something run of the mill. What statement are you making through your work?

​​​​​​​​

CD : You are correct. There were definitely beers and arcade games during that first meetup. The Before Times! As for your question, I'm always cautious of having a canned or stock response to this kind of thing. But here's where my head is at as of now: I am interested in grappling with what reality is and how to depict it within the flat confines of the picture plane. There are so many interpenetrating levels of reality: a rational/conscious level, an irrational or unconscious level, an input level (reception through the senses), an output level (projection of inner vision as in dreams or hallucinations), a psychological level, an energetic or pranic level, etc. What does it look like if we flatten all of those layers together? I'm not so much making a statement about these things as much as I am just acknowledging their existence and the influence they play in the look and feel of my work. Ultimately it seems like reality is something we can never fully know. (At least not while we are still trapped within the monkey body.) We seem like a species still in its infancy in this regard. I’m hopeful that greater popular acceptance of the controlled use of psychedelics might act as a catylist in fast forwarding our understanding of these things and thereby bring us into a more intimate relationship with the full spectrum of reality. We need all the help we can get!

​​​​​​​

​​​​​​

 

Name : Christopher Davison  

What kind of artist : Drawings, Paintings, Prints

Based in : NYC, USA

Website/instagram/facebook/etc… : https://christopherdavison.com

Christopher_Davison_Kissing Comet.jpgの複製

 

 

DYH :  Throughout your works, “magic/sorcery” seems to pop up often as themes. Figures appear, at once looking like us yet looking completely opposite, almost satanic... Or spiritual or tribal. Something primordial, almost like looking at the roots of humanity. Do the genre of comics or illustrations ever affect your painting approach? You have a pretty distinct style. Can you tell us about how that came to be?

​​​​​​​​

CD : I was taught to draw in a very process-driven way, where mark-making and intuition come before subject matter. You can, eventually, arrive at a uniform look and feel to your work but it takes a long time. With this approach you have to have faith in the unknown - perhaps The Unknown. If the subject matter seems to involve magic it is probably because the process feels like it does too. In watching my two year old daughter draw, I see that this is the way that we were originally programmed to make art. She will make a scribble, stare at it for a few seconds and then yell with amazement, “Look! An airplane!” This type of drawing is more like reading tea leaves or interpreting a hexagram with the I-Ching. Over the years I had to do a lot of reading and research to help me better grasp what I was dredging up from the unconscious and thereby put the pieces together with greater intention and meaning. I read a few books by Jung that were highly influential and a range of mythological and spiritual texts (especially Hindu, Gnostic, and Christian Mysticism). A smattering of philosophy has come in handy too. For anyone else out there on a similar research path, I HIGHLY recommend Ananda Coomaraswamy’s writings. He will point you in all the right directions with footnotes of pure gold. Regarding style, I never got into comics but the graphic vibe of the work is definitely indebted to similar-looking but older aesthetic sources like medieval art, Babylonian sculpture, and Egyptian hieroglyphics (all pretty heavy on the outline vibe).

​​​​​​​​

Christopher_Davison_Expulsion.jpgの複製

 

 

DYH :  Do you have a routine in the studio? How often do you work? From what time to what time? If you are living with your partner or your family, can you please tell us how you make that work? I’m nosy, I know.

​​​​​​​​

CD : This is slightly embarrassing, but I will share it in case anyone out there can learn from my mistakes. It has only been recently, in the last couple years since my daughter was born, that I started to finally get real about time management and develop my powers of concentration (Dharana) in the studio. Here’s my current, actually-getting-shit-done studio situation: I have space for my studio in our apartment so there is no commute involved. My daughter is now in daycare 4 days a​​​​​​​​​week. On those days I aim for 4-5hrs of art making which equals 16-20hrs a week (although I can sneak in a couple additional hours if necessary on the other 3 days). This will sound super OCD but I track my time using the Timer+ app and log my hours using the Done app. I used to be a wreck in the studio so I really need the imposed structure for now to stay on point. In Philly I used to go to the studio for 8 hours a day but spend 80% of that time goofing off. Now it's 4-5 completely focused and productive hours. I’m not only more productive now in the studio but each week I set aside time for practicing Spanish, running or yoga, meditation, and reading (tracking each of these also on Done - TOTAL OCD!).

​​​​​​​​

DYH :  Oh Chris, isn’t daily life just a cacophony of incidents? Fun things, unbelievable things, sad things.... Children are angels but also they are devils(we all know). Have you found yourself being irritated at your kids? If you have anecdotes, we’d love to hear.

​​​​​​​​

CD : Last night my daughter screamed her head off from 9pm-10pm. Obviously, at this hour she should have already been asleep. We couldn't figure out what was going on. Finally we realized that she was crying for this plastic yellow egg, in which she had placed a little yellow piece of sea glass. She wanted to bring it into bed with her. Once she had it, she feel instantly to sleep. That was the entire issue! Who does that? Having a child is like living with a little alien. It's like, "Oh! You sleep with little eyellow eggs on your planet? Cool. I didn't know that!" She can be frustrating at times but she is super awesome overall. I think we lucked out with her ratio of awesome to frustrating. I really have to thank her because she has inspired me to work towards manifesting my best self. I want her to be proud of me and my art. I don't want her to necessarily become an artist but at the same time, I don't want her to think that pursuing an art career is a joke or something to not take seriously. I want her to be proud of who I am and what I do.​​​​​​​​

​​​​​​​

​​​​​

Christopher_Davison-Rite of Eleusis.jpgの複製

DYH :  Covid certainly has made things more tough, but have you conducted any studio visits lately? Art buyers or any of those art related people visiting the studio is a bit different from having friends and family over casually, isn’t it? In a way, you are putting on a kind of special show just for them... Do you have any of your own tips on how to navigate studio visits? How to make yourself enjoyable? Feel free to skip this if you have nothing(laughs).

CD : I have had a few studio visits from collectors since COVID. Yes it’s a bit weirder now than it used to be but once you determine what each person is comfortable with (Masks on still? Handshake? Don’t touch me? Snacks or beverages despite masks? Touching snacks in same bowl? Show my vaccine passport? Etc), it's exactly the same! Haha

​​​​​​​​

4Christopher_Davison-Sweetheart.jpgの複製

 

DYH :  For things you like, is it important to be able to say “I like this”. And for things you dislike, “I don’t like this”. Is it really important to be able to put these feelings into words? This one’s out of left field I know.

​​​​​​​​

CD : If we are not specifically talking about art but just the assertion of opinions in general, I know some people who can state their likes and dislikes and opinions on this and that with 100% confidence. I’m not one of those people. However, I always find it impressive and intimidating at first when I meet someone who is. When you get to know someone like that over time, you begin to realize that that overly assertive posture is often just a projection meant to cover up some underlying insecurity. All I know for sure is that for every topic there is more than one way to look at it. We shouldn't be crippled with indecision but we should be skeptical of anyone who instantly claims to know the ONE and ONLY interpretation of an issue. There is no one fixed and hard way to approach anything - all is in flux. There isn’t much to cling to here on Earth, physical things or opinions alike, and we just have to settle into that truth and approach things with a continually open, beginners mind.

​​​​​​​​

DYH :  What kind of friends do you have? What are their personalities? What kind of work do they do? Do they live close? What kind of things do you talk about? I’m curious pants!!!

​​​​​​​​

CD : Before moving to NYC, I lived in Philadelphia for about 10 years. In Philly all of my artist friends lived in close proximity because the city is relatively small, compared to New York. I would often see people I knew while I was out walking my dog or biking across town to the studio. I'm sure this same type of thing happens to plenty of artists who live in Brooklyn but in Washington Heights (the far northern tip of Manhattan) there are less artists and more or less I keep to myself. It takes me an hour on the train to get to Brooklyn and since time is limited, due to raising my daughter, spending 2 hours out of my day sitting on a train is often a bit more than I can manage. Some of my oldest friends, who lived here when we originally moved to New York in 2015, have since left the city for greener pastures. But I would like to get back to a slightly more social lifestyle as we snake our way through, and hopefully out of, the pandemic. I do have some artist buddies that I meet up with from time to time, though and we typically connect in Chelsea or Lower East side to split the difference on the commute.

5Christopher_Davison_Self Timer.jpgの複製

 

DYH :  You were a teacher in Philadelphia previously right? If you could say one thing to all the art students out there, what would you want to tell/teach them?

​​​​​​​​

CD : I would like to tell them "You don’t have to go to school!" But whether you go or not, you do need to bust your ass to be an artist. Despite all appearances to the contrary, it’s not a good career for slacking off. You don’t really need to earn a degree in art unless you want to teach. Consider why you want to go to school or why you are currently in school. If you are there for the privilege of having people around to give your creative endeavors some attention, keep in mind that those same people won't be doing that after you graduate (unless you organize it yourself). A lot of art students stop making art about 2 years after finishing school. This is because no one is there to pay attention to their work anymore. Besides university, another path is to just reach out to a well known artist and ask to be their assistant (obviously living near where they work would be helpful). Work with them for free or for a fair hourly rate. It's possible you'll get more technical knowledge and real world connections in a few months than from spending 2 to 4 years in art school. If you don't show much promise in technique or goof off too much, the artist who has hired you will just give you the boot. Art schools will never do that because they want you to keep paying some exorbitant tuition. I'm not anti-art school but I do think there are too many, they are too expensive, and they rarely give you the proper guidance for how to make it as an artist once you obtain your degree (possibly because most of the faculty do not make a living from their art either). Sorry if this is an unexpectedly prickly response. Just trying to speak some truth to power from experience and be as direct as possible in case it’s of help to anyone out there.

​​​​​​​​

DYH :  I hear you experienced an interesting incident at school when you were there as a teacher. Students and teachers are all humans after all. Any stories worth sharing?

​​​​​​​​

CD : There were many “interesting” incidents!” Too many to recount here! This is an area better left unsaid in print but next time we have a beer or two in person we can circle back to it.

​​​​​​​

2Christopher_Davison_Moon Room.jpgの複製

 

​​​​​​​

DYH :   As an artist, what do you learn from going to art school? What’s the positive side of it? Also, what kind of advantages do self-taught artists have? CV’s on artists’ websites all look similarly bland, but in the end, what is the most important lesson for an artist to learn? How do you approach this topic in your observations?

​​​​​​​​

CD :The most important thing is whatever gets that fire burning - where you cannot imagine your life without making art. It's as if a switch gets turned on and can no longer be turned off. I think, as a teacher, that’s the ultimate thing - to awaken a passion for art within each student. It's not about teaching them anything new. It's about putting the right kind of kindling on a flame that was already present. Everything else (technique, art history, materials, etc) is secondary.

​​​​​​​​

DYH :   Stop me if you’ve heard this before, “What do you do? Oh an artist I see. So, what kind of art?” How do you answer questions like this? Do you change your answer depending on whether that person is from the art community? In other words, please tell us how you define yourself.

​​​​​​​​

CD :I typically say “I make drawings and paintings.” No matter who I’m addressing. I think this is where Instagram or a website can be super helpful as a quick visual overview. Then they can look and say “oh cool. You are that type of artist.” Or they might say “oh you are a little weirder than I thought! I really should be going now!” I try not to say "I'm an artist," especially when talking to people who might not be very knowledgable about the art world. I fear the kind of image they might conjure up in their head. Like they would either think that I do some kind of super fucked up performance art (yelling into a microphone while smearing feces on the wall) or that I sit seaside and make impressionist paintings of boats (barrette on my head, casually chatting with passers by, tearfully watching a seagull fly towards the setting sun).

​​​​​​​​

DYH :  As a visual artist, are there any challenges you face in trying to communicate your works through words?

​​​​​​​​

CD :Definitely! I think we will always fail or fall short in this area but it’s still good, from time to time, to try to parse our visions through the written word. Matisse actually did a lot of interviews and writing about art but later in life he said "Whoever wishes to devote himself to painting should begin by cutting out his own tongue." The main challenge, of course, is the disjuncture between the linguistic attributes of visual art

​​​​​​​(the abstract, intuitive, gestalt of a work of art) and the linguistic attributes of writing about it (where we often aim for specificity, objectivity, and are bound by the linear temporality of written or spoken language). But I do think it’s a great struggle to engage with now and then. Writing has a way of solidifying some nebulous notions that otherwise just keep swirling around in our head. Is it better to clarify these things? Is it better to leave them mysterious to ourselves or others? In the Philip Guston documentary "A Life Lived" he says, "If I were to stop painting and became a psychologist of the process of making, I would probably understand it more but it wouldn't do me any good." I think whether we want to know or not depends on who we are and where we are in our own evolution as individuals and artists.

7Christopher-Davison_studio.jpgの複製

.

​​​​​​​​

DYH :   By the way, what is an “artist” really?(lol) What are your thoughts in regards to the social distance between an artist and the society we now live in?

​​​​​​​​

CD :Ultimately, the disjuncture between art and everyday life is a huge problem and neither galleries or museums are going to be able to fix it. The issue cuts to the very foundation of modern civilization. We've simply left art out of the warp and woof of life. Somewhere along the march of "progress" we left some very important things behind us. Over the past 100 years or so we have begun to realize our mistake but we have no idea how to remedy it. Picasso was ripping off African masks because he saw in them something magical that European culture had forgotten about. But just copying (stealing?) the forms of other cultures is not going to fix anything. The thing we are missing is what you intuit when you visit a 3rd world country and there is no distinction between "fine" art and craft, or between the mundane and the transcendental. Despite living in relative poverty, you sense that a deep and profound meaning permeates everything there. This is such a big topic. I too am caught up in this modern culture so I can't get the right perspective on the situation either. It has something to do with the way we no longer tell stories, we play a video of what happened. It has something to do with the fact that we see art as a thing whereas it is more like a way of being. There is a super cheesy quote by Coomaraswamy but I think it hits close to the mark here, "The artist is not a specialized kind of person; rather each person is a specialized kind of artist." We have forgotten that everyone is a certain type of artist. So it's like we've disenfranchised the soul of an entire culture.

​​​​​​​

​​​​​​

Christopher_Davison_Seeing Without 8Gravity.jpgの複製

 

​​​​​​​​

DYH :   Although it’s been said by many people, in the making-of doc of “Blood Sugar Sex Magic”, John Frusciante of Red Hot Chili Peppers said “at the end of the day, your biggest enemy is yourself.” Cheeky, and not exactly original. But, what do you think of this? Is it really true in your field too?

​​​​​​​​

CD : It's absolutely true in all areas. We really hold ourselves back. Or our unconscious biases, or subconscious beliefs, or however you'd like to say it, constantly put us at odds with our conscious aspirations. This is where the insight of a good friend, or self-reflective writing exercises, or self-help books, or therapists can help us shine some light on our shadow selves. Last year I worked with a shaman/healer/artist named Michelle Rothwell in Philly who really helped me shine some light on a couple key areas that I needed to work on. This year I was able to take those problem areas and work on them further. I can honestly say that I'm ending 2021 healthier than I've ever been my whole life. I think artists in particular can be rather fucked up psychologically (thanks less than ideal childhood!) and we are often drawn to art because it's a way of giving form to some of those ineffable feelings that are brooding in the darkness. But, as incredibly helpful as art is in this area, we have to use other tools as well if we really want to fix our issues (instead of perpetually keeping them around because we think we need them as fuel for our work). Some audiobooks that I recently listened to that were super helpful in this area are, "As A Man Thinketh" by James Allen, "The Power of Now" by Eckhart Tolle, and "Loving What Is" by Byron Katie. A line from the James Allen book states "most people want to change their situations but do not want to change themselves." It's so true! Oh, and one more quote that just came to mind from Nietzsche, "Of all the arts, knowing oneself is the hardest and takes the longest to master." I can't remember which book that is from but it may be Thus Spake Zarathustra.

​​​​​​​​

DYH :  Hey! You live and work in NYC! Tell us more. Why NYC?

​​​​​​​​

CD : When I was younger, I always wanted to live in NYC but found myself locked into a hard to abandon lifestyle in Philly (part-time teaching, big cheap art studio, cheap apartment with fireplaces and huge ceilings, etc.). However in 2015 my wife started her surgery residency in NYC and that prompted the somewhat unexpected move. I kept my teaching gigs in Philly for a number of years (despite the slightly absurd commute from NYC) but those dried up right around when my daughter was born in 2019. I have a love-hate relationship with NYC. It's a city that has knocked me on my ass at times but I've learned a lot from it. You learn to be more assertive here - to just jump in and do it. It's demanding in a way that Philly never was and I've had

​​​​​​​to grow as a person to meet those demands. It has also taught me more negative things like "Don't expect people to be kind." Ultimately, it doesn't feel like a healthy place for me to stay longterm - especially now that we have a kid. We want more space, more grass, more sky, less honking, less ridiculous peacocking at art openings. Next summer we are moving to San Francisco. I realize SF has it's own issues and isn't a perfect solution either but with climate change it is so hard to know where the right place to move is anymore. Anyway if anyone in the Bay Area would like to connect, please reach out!

6Christopher-Davison_Hildegard.jpgの複製

 

​​​​​​​​

DYH :  How was this interview? Sorry for the blah blah blah, hope it was fun for you. Any last words?

​​​​​​​​

CD : This was great. I really had to work this over quite a number of times. Thanks for the interest in my work and challenging questions! Onward and upward Shohei! Your new work is looking awesome. You have some seriously good things coming up on the horizon. I'm never wrong about these things! It's a six sense I have. Bye for now! See you in the future!

 
Christopher_Davison_The Six Senses.jpg

December 12, 2021

Interviewed by Shohei Takasaki

Christopher Davison

名前:クリストファー・デイビソン

種類:ドローイング、ペインティング、プリント

活動拠点:アメリカ・ニューヨーク

ウェブサイト : https://christopherdavison.com

DYH : クリス、前に会ったのはもう大昔のように感じますよね。どこかのマンハッタンのスポーツバーかなんかかな?まず初めに、ありきたりな、つまらない質問をさせて下さい。あなたは、あなたのクリエイションを通してどんな主張をしているのですか?

 

CD : そうだね。最初に会った場所はビールやらアーケイド・ゲームなんかが色々あった場所だったね。信じられる?コロナ前だよ!そうそう、この質問ね、、、ありきたりの答えにならないように気をつけつつ、、、最近考えてるのは、僕にとっての現実/リアリティとはいったい何なのか、そしてそれをどうやって絵画の限られた表面の中で表現できるのか。ここで言ってる現実/リアリティは幾層にもあるよね:理性的や意識的だったり、不合理や無意識、もしくは受け入れる度合い(純粋に感覚だけを通じての)、そして自分から出ていく出力の度合い(夢や幻覚を通した内なる視覚/ビジョンの投射)、心理的なレベル、エネルギッシュやパニック状態の度合い、などなどね。もしそれらのすべてを平たくしたらどうなるのか?ま、とはいえ特にこのことについてただコメントをしている訳じゃなくて、単純にそれらの存在や影響がどう自分の作品に現れるかについて話しているだけだよ。結局、この現実/リアリティってやつはどこまで行っても完全には知り得るものではないだろうからね(少なくても僕らの「マインド」が、この猿みたいな現状の「体」ってものに囚われてる限りは!)。もしかしたらさ、僕ら人間の種はまだ発展途上なのかも、、、もし合法な幻覚剤などがもう少し普及してくれたら、僕らがこの現実/リアリティの全貌を理解するのにだいぶ大きな手助けになるだろうね。僕らには助けが必要なんだよ!!!

​​​

​​​​​​​​

Christopher_Davison_Kissing Comet.jpgの複製

DYH:あなたの作品にいつも見え隠れするテーマとして、「呪術」的な要素がありますよね。人物がいつも登場し、彼らはまるで僕ら自身であるようで、もしくは全く真逆の何か、サタニックなもう一つの自分であるかのような。。。もしくはスピリチュアル、またはトライバルな、原始的な人間の生物としての根源を作品に見ることもできるかもしれません。そしてペインティングのアプローチとしては、コミックやイラストレイションの分野などからもしかしたら影響を受けているのかしら?あなたの独特なスタイルは、一体どうやって形作られてきたのかな?教えて頂戴。

 

​​​​

CD : 僕は、サブジェクト・マター(題材)よりもまずは直感としての印をつけることが大事、つまり手順(方法、工程)ありきで作品が作られるべきだと教わりました。誰かのコピーに見えるだけのようなものじゃなく、

最終的には統一された「自分の」スタイルに行き着くことは可能だと思うけど、とても時間がかかるだろう。このアプローチでは「未知」に対して寛大であることが大事。神聖、偉大なる未知だよ!もし題材が魔術、魔法を扱ってるように見えるとしたら、それはきっとプロセス自体に魔術があるからだろうね。2歳の娘を見ていると、僕たち人間はきっとこういうふうにアートを作るようにプログラムされていたんだと気付くよ。彼女は落書きをして、数秒見つめたら「見て!飛行機!」と叫びます。このタイプのドローイングのアプローチは茶柱占いとか風水の世界と一緒だよね。長年をかけ色々な本を読んだりリサーチをしてきた中で、自分が自身の無意識の中から掬い上げてたものが一体何なのかを知ることが出来たかもしれない。おかげで制作のプロセスの中で意図的にAとBなどを組み合わせたり、そして一体それが何を意味するのかっていうことをさらに理解することが出来るようになったんだと思う。

ヤングのいくつかの書籍、特に神話や精神文化に関するテキストなど(ヒンズー教、ノスティック経、キリスト教の神話的解釈など特に)や、哲学も少しかじったのが役に立ったのかもしれないね。それと、もし僕と同じようなエリアでリサーチをしている人がいたら、アナンダ・クーマラスワミーの著書、これはマジでおすすめします!正しい方向に君を導いてくれるに間違いない。びっくりするような素晴らしい補足的説明と一緒にね!!!そしてスタイルに関しては、コミックスにはあまり興味を持たなかったけど、僕の作品のグラフィカルな雰囲気はバビロン文化やエジプトの象形文字など(キャラクターなどのアウトラインが太く強調されているっていう傾向がある)、古典美学に通ずるものがあるのかもしれない。

 

Christopher_Davison_Expulsion.jpgの複製

 

 

DYH : あなたのスタジオでのルーティーンはありますか?週にどのくらい、何時から何時まで制作しているのですか?もしあなたがパートナーやファミリーと一緒に生活しているとしたら、彼らとの折り合いはどうやってつけているのですか?ごめんなさいね、気になるのです。

 

CD : これはチョ~っと恥ずかしいけど、もしだれかの参考になればと思ってシェアしよう。本当に最近まで、僕は時間管理が出来なかった。ここ何年かで娘が生まれて、やっと時間のマネージメントをするようになって、そしてスタジオで集中力(ダラナ)を養えるようにもなった。今現在の「マジでスタジオで制作するぞ」ルーティンはこちら → まず、住んでいるアパートにスタジオスペースがあるので通勤はない。今娘は週4でデイケアに通っててその間4-5時間くらいは制作してるって感じだね、大体16-20時間/週てとこかな(もし必要がある場合は、追加の制作時間をこっそり残りの3日間でやることもできる)。それとちょっと几帳面すぎるかもだけど、Time+アプリで時間をトラッキングして、それをDoneアプリで管理をしたりも。今まではスタジオの中ではボロボロだったから、こうやって厳しく規律を導入しないとすぐ道を外してしまう。フィラデルフィアにいたときは、一日8時間スタジオで過ごしてても、そのうちの80%くらいはただふざけて遊んでたからね。でも今それは4-5時間の完全に集中した制作タイムになった。生産性が向上したし、スペイン語の勉強やランニングやヨガ、瞑想、読書にも時間を使ってる(Doneアプリを使ってね。笑 強迫神経症かも!!?)

 

DYH:クリス、僕らは毎日楽しいことやつまんないことや、何でもないことや、悲しいことや、いろんな事柄が起こる中で生活をしてますよね。そして子供は天使でもあり、悪魔でもあります 笑。最近とんでもなく子供に対してイライラしたことはありましたか?何かもし思いつけば、シェアできます?

 

CD : うん。昨日の夜、娘が夜の9時~10時くらいまで泣き叫んでわめいてたよ、、、

勿論毎日のおやすみの時間はとっくに過ぎてた。僕らは最初何でか全くわからなかった。でも最終的にやっと分かったんだけど、彼女が作ったなんだか黄色いプラスチックの卵に小さい黄色のガラス片を載せたものがあってさ、それと一緒にベッドで寝たかったんだろうね、昨日は。手に入れた途端にソッコー眠りに着いたよ。。。

それがすべてなんだ!!!全くなんてことだよ。小さい子供を持つってのはエイリアンと住むのと同じことなんだね。「へー、あなたの星では黄色い卵と一緒に寝るんだね!すごい。知らなかった!」ってか。まあ大変な時ももちろんたくさんあるけど、基本すばらしいことだらけだね。「大変」と「最高」ってのを比率で表したら僕らはとてもラッキーだとは思う。彼女に本当に感謝だよ。僕は彼女のおかげでベストな自分に向かって歩いていける。

彼女には僕自身と、僕の作るアートを誇りに思っていて欲しい。彼女にはとりわけアーティストになって欲しいっていう願望はないけども、それ​​と同時にアートをキャリアにするってことを冗談とか遊びだって思って欲しくないね。彼女には僕が歩んでる道を誇りに思っていて欲しい。​​​​​​​​

Christopher_Davison-Rite of Eleusis.jpgの複製

DYH:このコロナの状況の中で難しくなったとは思いますが、最近スタジオ・ビジットはありましたか?友達や家族が来る時と、アートバイヤーやアート業界の人たちが来るときの違いはやっぱりありますかね。ある意味、彼らのためだけの、スペシャル・ショウを開催しているのと同じことですよね、、、スタジオ・ビジットをエンジョイするためのあなたの攻略法を教えて下さい。もし何かしらあれば。無ければ全然スキップしても良いよ。笑

 

CD : コロナ禍の中でも、コレクターさん達何人かにスタジオビジットに来てもらったよ。以前と比べてちょっと難しい(変な感じ)のは確かだけど、まあそれぞれの人の好みが分かっちゃえば

(マスク有り?握手?接触NG?マスクありでもスナックと飲み物OK?同じお皿に盛ってあるスナックを触ってもOK?ワクチンパスポート掲示?など)、あとは同じでしょ!!!笑

4Christopher_Davison-Sweetheart.jpgの複製

 

 

DYH:突然だけど、好きなものに対して、「好き」ってはっきり言うこと、そして嫌いなものにははっきり声を大にして「嫌い」って言うことは、いつでも大事なことだと思う?

 

CD : まず、これはアートに限っての話じゃなくて、一般的な話だとしてね。

自分の好き嫌いを100%の自信を持って言える人って居るよね。僕もそういう人たちを知っている。僕自身はというとその内には入らないけど、そういう人たちと初めて会ったりする時、僕は正直ちょっと脅威みたいなものを覚える。でも彼らと過ごす時間が増えるにつれて、そのすごく断言的なスタンスは自身の短所や自信が欠落しちゃってる部分を補っているだけなんだってことに気付くことがある。僕が知ってる絶対確実なことってのは、どんなことにも解釈がたった一つしかないってことは絶対にありえないってことなんだ。もちろん思考停止になっちゃったらダメだけど、「これしか絶対に答えはない!」なんてことを言う人はチョ~っと怪しんでもいいかもしれない。確実なことなんか無い、すべてが流動的なんだと僕は思う。意見や物理的なものだったとしても、この地球上でしがみつくものなんてものはないんじゃ無いかな。その真理みたいなものに心を開き、常に初心を忘れることなくいるべきだよ。

 

​​​​​​​

DYH:あなたの周りにいる中の良い友達って一体どんな人たち?どんな性格?どんな仕事してるの?近くに住んでるの?どんな話してるの?ちょっと気になるので教えてもらえますか?

 

CD : NYCの前はフィラデルフィアに10年ほど住んでた。フィリーにいた時、アーティストの友達はみんな近くに住んでたね。ニューヨークに比べて町が小さいからさ。よく犬の散歩中やチャリでスタジオに向かっている時なんかに知り合いに会ったな。ブルックリン在住のアーティスト達はきっとこういう経験が多いとは思うけど、僕はワシントン・ハイツ(マンハッタンの北端)に住んでて、アーティストのご近所さんはあんまり見かけないから結構

一人でいることが多いかな最近。ブルックリンに行くのに1時間掛かるから、往復2時間でしょ〜。娘の面倒があるし、時間が勿体無いかな〜〜〜。2015年に引っ越してきた昔からの友達の何人かはすでにNYをあとにしたよ。でももう少し社交的なライフスタイルは取り戻したいところ。どうにかこのパンデミックを切り抜けてさ。昔から時々会うアーティストの友達が何人かいるけど、大体チェルシーやロウアーイーストサイドなんかの中間地点で会うって感じだね。

5Christopher_Davison_Self Timer.jpgの複製

 

 

DYH:以前にフィラデルフィアで先生をしていましたよね。アートも学ぶために学校に来る生徒たちに敢えて言うとしたら、何を一番伝えたかったのでしょう?

 

CD : 僕はこう言いたいね → 「学校なんて行かなくていいんだよ!」ただし、行っても行かなくても、最大限の努力はしないとダメだよ。そりゃあもちろん。ゆるーく頑張れるようなキャリアではないよ、そうは見えないかもしれないけどもさ。

先生になりたい場合を除いて学位を得る必要は無いと僕は思う。なぜ学校に通っているのか、なぜ行きたいのかを考えて見てほしい。もし君が、自身の作品に注目をしてもらうために学校に通っているとして、例えば今現在注目をしてくれている「人たち」は、あなたが卒業してからも同じ注目をあなたに注ぐことはおそらくしないだろう(まあ君が敢えてそれを企画すれば違うかもしれないが)。美術大学を卒業してから大体2年後、多くの人たちはアートを作ることをやめてしまうんだね。これはだれにも注目してもらえないからだよ。学校に行く以外の道としては、、、有名なアーティストのアシスタントに何とかなっちゃうことがいい方法かもしれない(そりゃあそのアーティストのスタジオが君のアパートメントと近かったら最高だよね)。もしかしたらタダ働きかも。もしかしたらちゃんとフェアな給料かも。どっちかは僕は分からないけど。2-4年の大学に行くよりさ、ちゃんとした技術を学ぶことが出来たり、現実の現場の世界のコネクションを得ることができるチャンスかもしれないよね。ただ、もちろん遊んでるだけだったりさ、きちんと期待に応えるような技術の上達なんかを見せれなければ、そのアーティストは君をクビにするかもしれない。でもその反面、学校は君を絶対にクビにはしないよ。だって君に途方もない授業料を永遠に払い続けてほしいからさ!ん、ちょっと待って、僕は決して「反美術大学」じゃない。じゃないけども、まず大学自体の数が多すぎるし、学費が高すぎる。そして、学位を取得したあとどうやってアートで生計を立てるのかを教えてくれない(先生達自身がアートで稼いで生活が出来てないからだよね)。頑固じじいみたいでごめんよ。。。僕が経験してきたことを素直に、率直に伝えようとしてるだけ。だってこれがもしかしたら誰かの助けになるかもしれないんだから。

 

DYH:教師として学校にいた時期、何か面白い事件などはありましたか?もちろん学校もいろんな生徒やいろんな先生がいるからね。何か笑えることがあったら是非教えて下さい。

 

CD : 面白い事件?たくさん有りすぎて数えきれないよ!この場(記録に残っちゃうからね、、、)ではやめといて、今度一緒にビール飲んだ時に話そう。

​​​​​​

​​​​​​​​​​​

2Christopher_Davison_Moon Room.jpgの複製

DYH:アーティストとして、アート・スクールに通うことで得られるポジティブスって一体何があると思いますか?強いていうとなんでしょう?そして、セルフトウト(独学)としてのアーティストたちのポジティブスはなんだと思いますか?基本的にアーティストのウェブサイトのCVページはどれも面白くなく、皆一緒に見えますが、結局アーティストにとっての「勉強」で一番大事なことは一体何なんでしょうね。

 

CD : 一番大事なのは創作意欲に火が付くかどうかだね。アートを作らない人生なんて絶対に考えられない、ってなってくれないと。先生として出来る最大のことは、生徒の中に潜在するアートに対する情熱を呼び起こすことだよ。一回入っちゃったスイッチはもう二度とオフにはならない。つまり新しいことを教えるんじゃなく、彼らの中に既にある火をどうやって燃え盛るように大きくしていくか。

それ以外のこと(テクニック、アートの歴史、マテリアル/材料への知識など)はすべて二の次。

 

DYH : 初対面で、こんな質問よくありますよね。「あなたは何をしているの?なるほど、アーティストですか。じゃあ、どんなアートなの?」立ち話程度の時に、あなたのいつもの答えはどういうものですか?アート・コミュニティの人たち、もしくはそうでない人たちなど、人によって答えを変えますか?つまり、あなたは自分をいつもどういう風に定義しているのでしょう。

 

CD : 大抵の場合、相手が誰であっても「ペインティングやドローイングを作ってる」と答えてるかな。こういう時こそインスタやウェブサイトが説明に役立つよね。で、「なるほど〜こういう感じのアーティストなんだね」だったり「思ったより変ね!そろそろ失礼しようかなー」なんてね。ま、僕はできるだけ「僕はアーティストです」って言わないようにしている。アートの世界の知識を持っていない人と会話をする時なんかは特にね。どんなイメージを持たれるか心配だしさ、、、。もしさ、僕のスタイルはスーパーぶっ飛んだパフォーマンスアート(マイクで叫びながら大便を壁に擦り付けたり)なんだねとか、海辺に座って印象派的なボートのペインティングをしてる(ベレー帽を被り、道ゆく人と気さくにおしゃべりしたり、沈む夕日に向かって飛んでいくカモメを見ながら涙したり)なんて誤解されたらどうすんのよ。

 

 

DYH : ヴィジュアル・アーティストとして、言葉で作品を説明することに対してのジレンマはありますか?

 

CD : もちろんあるよ!この問題はね、、、僕らはホントによく失敗するし、なかなか上手くいかないけど、それでもやっぱり言葉を通して自分のビジョンを伝えることはとっても大事だ。実はマティスはたくさんのインタビューを受けたし、自身のアートについてたくさんの文章も残してるけど、とはいえ、彼は人生の後半にはこんなことを言ってる:「ペインティングに本当に専念したいのなら、自らの舌を切り取るべきです」。メインのチャレンジはもちろん、視覚芸術の言語的な属性(抽象的や直感的だったりする作品の形態)と、それらの作品について執筆することの属性(僕らはよく具体性と客観実在性を直線的に一つまとめにして書いたりまたは直接話したりしようとするけども)の接続が断たれた状態であるってことだ。これらについて考え、もがき苦しむってことはとってもいいことだと思う。ライティング/執筆っていう行為は、頭の中の漠然とした不明瞭なものをある程度はハッキリとしたものにしてくれるよね。ただ、これらを明確化することが実はいいことなのかな?それともビューアーや自分自身にとっても謎めいたままの状態で放っておくべきなのかな?って問題はある。フィリップ・ガストンのドキュメンタリー映画「A Life Lived(我が人生)」で彼は言ってた「もし私がペインティングを作るのをやめて、アート制作の過程を研究する心理学者になったとすれば、きっと理解自体は深くなるでしょうが、それが必ずしも私にとって役に立つということではありません。」だから、答えを知った方がいいのかどうかっていうのは、僕ら自身がそれぞれ一体何者なのかってことにもよるよね。

7Christopher-Davison_studio.jpgの複製

DYH:結局のところ、「アーティスト」って、何なんだろうね、一体 笑 アーティストと僕らが生きるこの社会の距離感ってどう考えてますか?

 

CD : 結局はね、僕らのこの日常生活と「アート」との乖離はとっても大きな問題で、ギャラリーや美術館がどうこうして対処できることではないんだよね。この問題は僕らが生きるこの現代社会の根底にあるものだと思う。発展を求めるが故に僕らは大切なものを置いてきぼりにしてきたんだね。過去100年ぐらいの間にようやくその過ちに気づき始めたみたいだけど、でもどうやって対処すべきか見当が付かずにいる。ピカソがアフリカン・アートのスタイルを盗んだのは、ヨーロッパの文化において忘れられていた何か特別なものがそこにあったから。でも異文化のスタイルをただコピー(盗む?)するだけじゃあ、なんの解決策にもならないよね。僕らに足りないものってのは一体何なんだろう?例えば発展途上国なんかに行った時に、彼らの文化の中には「美術」と「工芸」、もしくは「超越的なもの」と「平凡なもの」なんかの間に境目なんか無いってことに気付く。相対的貧困の中で生活をしていても、そこには深く重大な意義みたいなものが浸透しているってことだと思う。大きなテーマだよ。もちろん僕も現代文化に囚われている身として、このことを正しい視点で見極めることなんか出来やしない。僕らは人から人へ、出来事なんかを伝えるときに直接の肉感的な「語り」を行う代わりに、単純にビデオを再生して終わり、で分かった気になっちゃってる。僕らはアートを「在り方」としてじゃなく、ただそこにある「もの」として捉えてることにも関係してるかもしれない。クーマラスワミーのこの安っぽいテキスト(とはいえ実はなんだかんだ言って確信を得てるんだよね)を引用すると:「『アーティストが特別な人間』なのではなく、『万人が特別なアーティスト』なのです」。すべての人が何かしらのアーティストなんだっていうことを僕らは忘れてしまった。この全体の文化からまるで魂か何かを根こそぎ抜かれちゃったのかのようだよ。

​​​​​​​​​

​​​​​​

Christopher_Davison_Seeing Without 8Gravity.jpgの複製

DYH:いろんな人たちが言ってきたのと一緒で、若き日のRed hot chili peppersのJohn Fruscianteも1991年の”Blood Sugar Sex Magic”のメイキングのドキュメンタリーの中で「なんだかんだ言っても最大の敵はやっぱり自分自身なんだ」なんて生意気に言ってますよね。それってどう思います?

 

CD : すべてにおいてまさにそうだね。僕らは自分自身にリミッターをかけてるよね。無意識な偏見、潜在的な信仰、まあどう表現するかはお任せするけど、意識的な願望と真っ向から対比してるよ。こんな時に効果的なのが、近い友達と一緒に過ごす時間や自分と向き合う執筆、読書、もしくはセラピストのところに行くってこともいいかも知れない。去年、フィリー(フィラデルフィア)を拠点とするミッシェル・ロスウェルというアーティスト/シャーマン/ヒーラーと一緒に仕事をしたんだけど、彼には本当に助けてもらった。光を灯すべき箇所に光が戻ってきたって感じだよ。今年は、自身で抱えていた問題と引き続き向き合うことができた。大袈裟じゃなくマジで言うけど、2021年はいままでの人生で一番健康的に終えられると思う。アーティストは特に精神的にぶっ飛んでいることが多くて(理想とは程遠い幼少期の環境のせいかな? 笑)、まるで暗闇に潜んでるような「言葉では表せない気持ち」を表現する術を与えてくれるアートに僕らはよく惹かれるよね。アートは本当に僕らをよく助けてくれる。なんだけど、本当は僕らが抱える問題を解決するためには違うツールを使うのが必須だと思う。これらの問題がさ、もしかしたらマシなアートを作る原動力になるかもなんて、わざとほっとくようなことはしないほうがいいよ。最近聞いたオーディオブックでおすすめなのがこのへん:ジェームズ・アレン著の「考えた通りに」やエカート・トレ著の「いま、この瞬間、ここに在るとき」、バイロン・ケイティ著の「苦しみの終わり」。ジェームズ・アレンの書籍からの次の一文がささりました:「多くの人は自らの状況を変えたいと思っているが、自分自身を変えたいとは思ってない。」これマジで真実だよ!あと、ニーチェのこれもいいかな:「どの道でも自身を知るということが一番難しく、一番時間がかかることだ。」どの本からかは忘れたけど、もしからしたら「ツァラトゥストラはこう言った」からかな。

 

 

DYH:いまの拠点NYCについて、聞きたいな。なんだかんだ言っても、やっぱりNYCが良いっていう理由を聞かせて!

 

CD : 若い頃はずっとニューヨークに住みたかったんだけど、フィリーの生活を断つのが難しくて(教師としてのバイト、安くてでっかいアートスタジオ、暖炉・高い天井付きの安いマンション、などなどの理由でさ)。でも2015年に妻がニューヨークでの研修を始めたのがきっかけで引っ越すことに。(ニューヨークからの通勤はばかばかしかったけど)フィリーでの教師のバイトは何年か続けてたんだよ。でも娘が2019年に生まれたらバイトもやめなきゃいけなかったね。ニューヨークは大好きで大嫌い。ニューヨークにはぶちのめされたし、その都度学んだことも多い。ここにいると積極的にならずを得ないんだよ。飛び込んで、行動しないと。フィリーでは考えられないくらいハードなんだけど、人間として成長しなければその要求に応えることができないんだ。ネガティブなこともたくさん学んだよ。(他人が)やさしくしてくれることを期待するな、とか。ここは長期的に腰を据える場所じゃないね、特に子供ができた今は。もっとスペースが欲しいし、芝生が欲しいし、空が欲しいし、クラクションがうざいし、エキシビジョンのオープンニングとかでのクジャッキング(孔雀の様に大げさに飾り羽を見せつけて周囲に自分の存在を見せつけようとするやつ、いるでしょ 笑)もうざいしね。来年の夏にはサンフランシスコに引っ越す予定なんだ。サンフランはそれはそれで問題があるってわかってるけど、気候変動とかもあるし結局どこへ行ったらいいか分からないよ!ベイエリアにいて僕みたいな奴と友達になってもいいよって人、ぜひご一報ください!

 

6Christopher-Davison_Hildegard.jpgの複製

 

 

DYH : このインタビューはどうでしたか?ダラダラと色々聞いてしまってごめんなさいね。そして何か最後に言っておきたい事があれば、何でもどうぞ。

 

CD : 素晴らしかったね。何回か見直さなきゃいけなかったかな。僕の作品に興味をもってくれて、そして噛みごたえのある質問をくれてありがとう!お互いがんばろうぜショウヘイ!君の新しい作品は素晴らしいね。まじ最高なものがこれから来そうな感じがするよ。俺はこういうことに関してははずさなくてね!第六感ってやつかな。またね!また近々会おう!

 ​​​​​